(Source: thelandofmaps)

capririsun:

i like seeing white girl jokes fading out and white boy jokes becoming more popular

(Source: nicolerichiest)

jizzkin:

straight people on tv show: *literally have sex*

*silence*

gay people on tv show: *exist*

ok.. :\ but… ok like im not homophobic… :\ im ok with gay people but why do you have to shove it in my face… :\

(Source: sadtit)

thymegaforeskin:

I almost died at this one

thymegaforeskin:

I almost died at this one

laughhard:

I don’t know where to even start

laughhard:

I don’t know where to even start

yastbh:

I love when this happens.

teenvogue:

Don’t worry, Emma Stone—we’re horrible liars too »

teenvogue:

Don’t worry, Emma Stonewe’re horrible liars too »

countingbooks:

"Why do we write fiction?"
To disappear

countingbooks:

"Why do we write fiction?"

To disappear

spacedmeanssomethingdifferentnow:

sunfell:

darkjez:

djphatrick:

A 13-Year-Old’s Slavery Analogy Raises Some Uncomfortable Truths in School
In a bold comparative analysis of TheNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Jada Williams, a 13-year old eighth grader at School #3 in Rochester, New York, asserted that in her experience, today’s education system is a modern-day version of slavery. According to the Fredrick Douglass Foundation of New York, the schools’ teachers and administrators were so offended by Williams’ essay that they began a campaign of harassment—kicking her out of class and trying to suspend her—that ultimately forced her parents to withdraw her from the school. In her essay, which was written for a contest, Williams reflected on what Douglass heard his slave master, Mr. Auld, telling his wife after catching her teaching Douglass how to read. “If you teach that nigger (speaking of myself) how to read, there will be no keeping him,” Auld says. “It will forever unfit him to be a slave. He would at once become unmanageable, and of no value to his master.”
Williams wrote that overcrowded, poorly managed classrooms prevent real learning from happening and thus produces the same results as Mr. Auld’s outright ban. She wrote that her white teachers—the vast majority of Rochester students are black and Hispanic, but very few teachers are people of color—are in a “position of power to dictate what I can, cannot, and will learn, only desiring that I may get bored because of the inconsistency and the mismanagement of the classroom.”
Read more: Education - GOOD
truth.

I’m so freaking proud of this child.

“The conservative Frederick Douglass Foundation gave Williams a special award, saying that her essay ‘actually demonstrates that she understood the autobiography.’ They have also reached out to the school for an explanation of the 13-year-old’s treatment.”


She spoke truth to power.

Good job helping make her argument more solid by kicking her out of class and forcing her parents to take her out of school.

spacedmeanssomethingdifferentnow:

sunfell:

darkjez:

djphatrick:

A 13-Year-Old’s Slavery Analogy Raises Some Uncomfortable Truths in School

In a bold comparative analysis of TheNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Jada Williams, a 13-year old eighth grader at School #3 in Rochester, New York, asserted that in her experience, today’s education system is a modern-day version of slavery. According to the Fredrick Douglass Foundation of New York, the schools’ teachers and administrators were so offended by Williams’ essay that they began a campaign of harassmentkicking her out of class and trying to suspend her—that ultimately forced her parents to withdraw her from the school.

In her essay, which was written for a contest, Williams reflected on what Douglass heard his slave master, Mr. Auld, telling his wife after catching her teaching Douglass how to read. “If you teach that nigger (speaking of myself) how to read, there will be no keeping him,” Auld says. “It will forever unfit him to be a slave. He would at once become unmanageable, and of no value to his master.”

Williams wrote that overcrowded, poorly managed classrooms prevent real learning from happening and thus produces the same results as Mr. Auld’s outright ban. She wrote that her white teachers—the vast majority of Rochester students are black and Hispanic, but very few teachers are people of color—are in a “position of power to dictate what I can, cannot, and will learn, only desiring that I may get bored because of the inconsistency and the mismanagement of the classroom.”

Read more: Education - GOOD

truth.

I’m so freaking proud of this child.

“The conservative Frederick Douglass Foundation gave Williams a special award, saying that her essay ‘actually demonstrates that she understood the autobiography.’ They have also reached out to the school for an explanation of the 13-year-old’s treatment.”

She spoke truth to power.

Good job helping make her argument more solid by kicking her out of class and forcing her parents to take her out of school.

(Source: daughtersofdig)

princess-hijabi:

global216:

For the 1st time ever, Muslims were at the Latino Day Parade in New York. 

Latino Muslims represent!

X X

WOOT

shytoaster:

spiderkiss:

poppypicklesticks:

maraudere:

Josh Thomas talks about male suicide

I wonder how feminists will react to this

Probably ignore it then go back to making male tears mugs and gifs 

Actually this is a very common idea among feminists

It’s something feminists have been talking about for years it’s called toxic masculinity and it’s one of the common threads among the topic of ‘Patriarchy hurts men too’. If fact the first time I read about toxic masculinity was on a feminist blog.

If you actually read things feminists talk about instead of straw manning them you might know this but OH WELL

saying ‘feminists don’t care about men’ conveys a very poor grasp of what feminism is